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                                              How It All Began

A review of the development of the Brangus breed would take us back beyond the founding of the American Brangus Breeders Association in 1949; however, registered Brangus descend from the foundation animals recorded that year or registered Brahman and Angus cattle enrolled since then. Much of the early work in crossing Brahman and Angus cattle was done at the USDA Experiment Station at Jeanerette, Louisiana -- the first crosses being made as far back as 1912.

During the same period, Clear Creek Ranch of Welch, Oklahoma, the Essar Ranch of San Antonio, Texas, and a few individual breeders in other parts of the United States and Canada were also carrying on private experimental breeding programs. They were looking for a desirable beef-type animal that would retain the Brahman's natural ability to thrive under adverse conditions in combination with the excellent qualities for which the Angus is noted.

The early breeders from 16 states and Canada met in Vinita, Oklahoma, on July 29, 1949, and organized the American Brangus Breeders Association, later renamed the International Brangus Breeders Association, with headquarters in Kansas City, Missouri. A permanent headquarters office building was occupied by the association in San Antonio, TX on Jan 1, 1973. There are now members in nearly every state, Canada, Mexico, Australia, Central America, Argentina, and South Rhodesia in Africa.

The concept of developing a new breed by stabilizing the best characteristics of two proven breeds in a fixed proportion is unique to the International Brangus Breeders Association. Rather than top crossing on commercial cows, proven individuals of the two parent breeds serve as the foundation for establishing new bloodlines.

Registered Brangus must be 3/8 Brahman and 5/8 Angus, solid black, polled as to conformation and breed character. Both sire and dam must be recorded with the International Brangus Breeders Association